Antonin Carette

Game Programmer

Changes are coming

Posted at — Mar 19, 2022

Working in a creative work environment is what I wanted to get into, since I was a kid.

First, I wanted to be a movie director (and a screenwriter), writing my own movies screenplays and directing actors to translate the words into images. But, then, I discovered Computer Science and something I would not imagine possible before 2005: I could make money programming video-games…

Video-games have seen me grow up, from my first console (the sega game gear) to the last one I bought (the nintendo switch), I was able to play many games that helped me define my personality, with books and movies I read / watched at this time.
And I was always blown away how the video-games and consoles were working, asking me all the time “How the creative people imagined this terrific sequence?!”, rave about a game with an innovative gameplay, or just magnificient graphics (Quake was a revelation early 2000s for me, as I discovered it very lately).

Quake is still one of my favorite games today

At this time (early 2000’s) the video-games industry was not so strong than today, and programmers were mainly nerds who spend most of their time at the office (including week-ends) making hard things and dealing with new hardwares / tools to try to sell “something” under X months. Based on the discussion with friends, my teachers and my parents, it was maybe not the right option at this time…

I became a developer, writing software for systems and (mainly) the web, and an associated R&D engineer for AI (machine learning and deep learning especially).
After several attempts in the web and AI industry, I worked my ass off before I realized (very recently) that I didn’t want to be part of both worlds, especially because I was almost never happy working on web / AI stuff.
I will not speak the reasons I decided to left those fields, as I would get too angry to continue this blog post…

Recently, I asked myself a very simple question: “where would I like to continue working?”, and the response was actually simple: “where the creative people are”.

After several weeks, discussing with people in some creative fields (movies and video-games especially), I decided to switch from a web/AI developer position to a game programmer related-position.

I don’t know when, I don’t know where, and I don’t know if this field will finally be the right one, but I will take time and do several trainings to find my way in the video-games industry.
Programming is what I do every day since more than 12 years now, and I am very very interested in learning how game engines work in general, and learn new things about optimization, graphics programming, and console hardware.

Wish me luck, I’m going to need it… but I never been excited like that since a lot a time, which is a very good sign!